Day One Journaling App – Discounted Today

DayOne Day One is an elegantly designed journaling application that runs on iOS and on OS X. It’s cloud integrated so that everything stays in sync and is accessible from anywhere. I use it and it’s an excellent tool. I highly recommend it.

Day One has been the App of the Week on the Mac App Store this week and today is the last day to get the OS X version (Mac) for 30% off ($6.99) and the iOS version (iPhone / iPad) for free.

Day One is made by Bloom Built, LLC and here’s their description.

Day One is a journaling app for the iPhone, iPad and Mac. Record life as you live it. From once-in-a-lifetime events to everyday moments, Day One’s elegant interface makes journaling your life a simple pleasure.

More about Day One is available on their web site.

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ClamXav 2.6.4

I use a Mac, and I’m thankful that the OS X platform has a history of fewer problems with malware than Windows. There are some ‘design’ reasons for that benefit to OS X users, but either way, it’s a good idea to keep the tools handy for protection against malware attacks.

ClamXav is a Mac port of the free and open source virus scanner called ClamAV. I have found it to be stable and reliable. It has been updated recently to version 2.6.4, and MacUpdate.com provides information about this latest release along with a description of the software provided by the developer.

ClamXav 2.6.4

Free virus checker, based on ClamAV
ClamXav

ClamXav is a free virus checker for OS X. It uses the tried, tested, and very popular ClamAV open source antivirus engine as a back end.

I hope you like and use ClamXav a lot and that it helps keep you and your friends/colleagues virus-free. Although I’m providing ClamXav for free, I am increasingly spending more and more time developing it and would really appreciate if you would consider making a donation please. All donations (no matter how small) are gratefully received and would be a huge incentive to help me work on future versions of ClamXav, but more importantly I rely on donations to pay for my bandwidth costs. Please consider it, see the ClamXav homepage, click the ‘More Information’ link above on this page.

What’s New

Version 2.6.4:

  • ClamAV engine updated 0.98.4
  • ClamXav now supports going full screen on OS X 10.7 or later
  • Fixed issue where ClamXav might incorrectly report a file being moved to quarantine
  • Fixed issue where ClamXav would crash if the RunFreshclam tool was missing
  • Fixed issue where clamdscan gets stuck in a loop using 100% CPU
  • Improvements for OS X 10.10 Yosemite

Transmission 2.84 – BitTorrent client updated

Transmission is my favourite BitTorrent client. It’s fast and efficient, has a very nice GUI, and it’s multi-platform. I enjoy using it to download free and open source software, especially Linux distributions.

Here’s the information from MacUpdate.com.

Transmission 2.84

Transmission

Transmission is a fast, easy and free multi-platform BitTorrent client.

Transmission sets initial preferences so things “Just Work”, while advanced features like watch directories, bad peer blocking, and the Web interface can be configured with just a few clicks. Macworld put it this way: “It’s fast, it’s extremely lightweight, and – even though it’s available for a variety of platforms – it behaves just as you’d expect a Mac program to.”

Transmission supports full encryption, file selection, a web-based interface, groups, peer exchange, automatic port forwarding, webseeds, watch directories, tracker editing, global and per-torrent speed limits, and more.

Its code is freely available online and is licensed under either the GNU Public License v2 or the MIT License. The development team welcomes anyone who is interested in contributing code, documentation, translations, or other help.

What’s New

Version 2.84:

  • Fix peer communication vulnerability (no known exploits) reported by Ben Hawkes

Apple OS Updates

Apple updated the OS X and iOS operating systems yesterday. Of note in these updates is a new version of Apple’s native web browser, Safari, which addresses several security issues. From Apple, here’s the description and some relevant links.

About the OS X Mavericks v10.9.4 UpdateMavericks

The OS X Mavericks 10.9.4 Update is recommended for all Mavericks users. It improves the stability, compatibility, and security of your Mac.

This update:

  • Fixes an issue that prevented some Macs from automatically connecting to known Wi-Fi networks
  • Fixes issue causing the background or Apple logo to appear incorrectly on startup
  • Improves the reliability of waking from sleep
  • Includes Safari 7.0.5

OS X Mavericks 10.9.4 Update
OS X Mavericks 10.9.4 Update (Combo)

iOS 7.1.2

This update contains bug fixes and security updates, including:

IOS7

  • Improves iBeacon connectivity and stability
  • Fixes a bug with data transfer for some 3rd party accessories, including bar code scanners
  • Corrects an issue with data protection class of Mail attachments

For information on the security content of this update, please visit this website: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1222

Available via iTunes or OTA

Calvin on Sacramental Efficacy

Calvin offers these helpful insights in his comments on Deuteronomy 30.6.

JohnCalvin

6. And the Lord thy God will circumcise thine heart. This promise far surpasses all the others, and properly refers to the new Covenant, for thus it is interpreted by Jeremiah, who introduces God thus speaking,—“Behold, the days come that I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel, and the house of Judah, not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers, … which covenant they brake, … but … I will put my law in their inward parts, and write it in their hearts.” (Jer. 31:31–33.) Moses now declares the same thing in different words, that, lest the Israelites, according to their wonted instability, should fall back from time to time into new rebellions, a divine remedy was needed, i.e., that God should renew and mould their hearts. In short, he reminds them that this would be the chief advantage of their reconciliation, that God should endow them with the Spirit of regeneration. There is a metaphor in this word circumcise; for Moses alludes to the legal sign of consecration, whereby they were initiated into the service of God. The expression, therefore, is equivalent to his saying, God will create you spiritually to be new men, so that, cleansed from the filth of the flesh and the world, and separated from the unclean nations, you should serve Him in purity. Meanwhile, he shews that, whatever God offers us in the Sacraments, depends on the secret operation of His Spirit. Circumcision was then the Sacrament of repentance and renewal, as Baptism is now to us; but “the letter,” as Paul calls it, (Rom. 2:27,) was useless in itself, as also now many are baptized to no profit. So far, then, is God from resigning the grace of His Spirit to the Sacraments, that all their efficacy and utility is lodged in the Spirit alone.

Calvin, J. & Bingham, C.W., 2010. Commentaries on the Four Last Books of Moses Arranged in the Form of a Harmony, Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software. (Emphasis added.)

Bookmarks for 15 April 2014 through 7 May 2014

These are my Pinboard links for 15 April 2014 through 7 May 2014:

Bookmarks for 4 April 2014 through 14 April 2014

These are my Pinboard links for 4 April 2014 through 14 April 2014:

Bookmarks for 17 December 2013 through 29 March 2014

These are my Pinboard links for 17 December 2013 through 29 March 2014:

Symbolism in politics

Dr Leithart reflects on ‘the political potency of symbolism‘ in an article titled ‘Who Wears the Crown‘ at the SBC web site Canon & Culture.

In a nutshell, Dr Leithart argues that while American Christianity tends to dismiss symbolism as the opposite of substance, this is out of touch with historical reality. Leithart argues that the cultural and political Left clearly grasps the importance of symbolism and uses it to outflank and overpower Christian advocates of cultural and moral sanity.

Christians today are often political Erasmians, and our oblivion leaves us politically vulnerable. We get out-flanked by opponents who know how to paint pictures and tell stories. Gay sex and gay marriage have been mainstreamed by activists who have slowly, deliberately created icons of gay normality. Obama laid out his version of American history in his second inaugural address with three symbolic movements of liberation—Seneca Falls, Selma and Stonewall.

Arguments won’t turn the tide. We need to fight symbols with symbols, stories with better stories, encouraged by the recollection that injustices and tyrannies have been toppled more often by symbols than by swords or bombs.

Dr Leithart is certainly correct that the Left has a mastery of the use of symbolism in their cause—indeed, symbolism that, while effective, also seems contrived and manipulative. But I think Dr Leithart is mistaken when he claims that better symbols will be more effective than better arguments for ‘our side’.

Symbolism is effective in animating a principle already present in a thought process. In the case of the ‘icons of gay normality’ the presence of that principle required the slow and deliberate undermining of competing views of morality. The ‘icons of gay normality’ are effective precisely because they nurture the view of sexual autonomy our society embraced many decades ago, a view that openly despises sexual chastity and actively embraces infidelity. The meaning of ‘love & marriage’ in our society today is no longer recognisable as the ‘one flesh’ bond God ordained.

Symbols need underlying propositions to give them meaning. On their own, symbols don’t mean anything. Symbols are only powerful when they are analogies or illustrations of things we are already inclined to believe. Indeed, symbols are most powerful when they help us to move subtle assumptions from the realm of tacit persuasion to full conviction.

The ‘icons of gay normality’ work because they are situated within a network of beliefs about sexuality that has nothing to do with God’s design and everything to do with sexual autonomy and sexual self gratification. These ‘icons’ are not self interpreting. Their meaning and effectiveness has everything to do with how they illustrate the application of already held beliefs to a wider situation.

And of course, that’s the problem with Dr Leithart’s suggestion that we ought to ‘fight symbols with symbols’. We no longer share with our opponents any of the propositional beliefs that would make our ‘symbols’ intelligible to them. Our ‘icons’ of fidelity and chastity have a very different meaning to them. Any such tokens represent to them the shackles of repulsive oppression and displays of repressive dishonesty.

I’m not denying the power of symbols and symbolic actions. I’m denying that they have an independent power to communicate meaning and to persuade. The ‘icons of gay normality’ are effective today because of decades of work that has preceded those icons, work of cultural transformation that has established a new norm for sexuality, a norm which makes sense of those icons and which those icons can now illustrate.

What, then, must we do? Well, let us start by examining ourselves to see if we have tacitly adopted ways of thinking, speaking, and acting that comport more with the oppositional viewpoint of sexuality than with what we claim to believe. Here’s where we still have some common beliefs with our opponents: we both have a fairly close notion of what constitutes high-handed hypocrisy. Let us stop living glibly in opposition to the very things we claim to believe! This isn’t a demand that we be morally perfect: imperfection is not the same thing as hypocrisy. Rather, I’m insisting that we must hold ourselves to the standard we profess and judge ourselves accordingly, bringing the grace of the Gospel to recover us from our sins and failings. This will involve us in some significant acts of sacrificial love, humble leadership, and bold testimony that may even rise to the level of ‘iconic’ symbolism Dr Leithart so admires.