Biblical guidance for parents of prodigals

Reverend Batzig provides practical and biblical advice for parents when their children stray from the faith.

What Should We Do When They Stray?

Heart

Of all the painful experiences that I have had to face through nearly a decade in ministry—the death of a mother, couples enduring the heartbreak of miscarriage, strife, abuse, divorce, scandal, etc.—having to walk with a godly father and mother through the dark shadows of having a child rebel is among the most difficult. There are many difficult and painful experiences that ministers face, but the spiritual rebellion of a child of a believer weighs heavily on the heart of any true minister of the Gospel. Perhaps it weighs heavy on my heart because I was one such rebellious child brought up in a Christian home. Though I was nurtured in an extremely spiritually and theologically strong Christians home, I ran from it–and to the spiritual darkness and sin of this world–as far and as fast as I could.

Drawing from the example of his own parents when he strayed from the faith as a young man, Reverend Batzig describes practical spiritual care focussing on the power of prayer and God’s Word in the mystery of God’s Providence. I encourage you to read this helpful article at the Feeding on Christ blog.

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Hallowed Be Thy Name

Westminster Larger Catechism Question 190

Q. What do we pray for in the first petition [of the Lord’s Prayer]?
A. In the first petition (which is, Hallowed be thy name), acknowledging the utter inability and indisposition that is in ourselves and all men to honour God aright, we pray, that God would by his grace enable and incline us and others to know, to acknowledge, and highly to esteem him, his titles, attributes, ordinances, word, works, and whatsoever he is pleased to make himself known by; and to glorify him in thought, word, and deed: that he would prevent and remove atheism, ignorance, idolatry, profaneness, and whatsoever is dishonourable to him; and, by his overruling providence, direct and dispose of all things to his own glory.

Psalm 99.1–3
The LORD reigneth; let the people tremble: he sitteth between the cherubims; let the earth be moved. The LORD is great in Zion; and he is high above all the people. Let them praise thy great and terrible name; for it is holy.

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Thoughts from Family Worship, 20 October 2010

“Charity never faileth” (1 Corinthians 13.8a) — Such selfless love does not end; it is not a temporary grace, but an everlasting one. Let us pursue the increase of such grace throughout this life as we prepare to experience that grace more fully in the next.


Westminster Shorter Catechism #22

Q: How did Christ, being the Son of God, become man?

A: Christ, the Son of God, became man, by taking to himself a true body, and a reasonable soul,1 being conceived by the power of the Holy Ghost, in the womb of the Virgin Mary, and born of her;2 yet without sin.3

Though truly God, the Son became truly man by taking to Himself a true human nature in its material and immaterial parts (a real physical body and a rational soul) such as we have, but without sin. In His human nature, Christ was miraculously formed by the Holy Spirit within the Virgin Mary and He was born of her just as we were born. This is part of how our glorious Redeemer humbled Himself for us, to be our perfect Prophet, Priest, and King.


  1. Philippians 2.7. Hebrews 2.14, 17. 
  2. Luke 1.27, 31, 35. 
  3. 2 Corinthians 5.21. Hebrews 4.15; 7.26. 1 John 3.5. 
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